National Geographic has listed the best 21 beaches in the world. West Australia’s Shell Beach is one of them. Australian beaches have been getting recognition these days whenever the top beaches around the world are discussed or talked about. The name of the WA beach has given the state an opportunity to grab focus and be listed on the global listing for the second time.

It seems important to mention that WA’s Cossies Beach grabbed the top spot on the listing when 101bestbeaches.com named the best beaches in Australia in December. The Shell Beach is a part of the Shark Bay. The UNESCO World Heritage site contains infinite white cockle shells. These cover the beach to up to 10m depth. The cockleshells extend to more than 120 kilometers area. The crisp and crystal clear blue water is yet another unique feature of the beach.

Shell Beach is one of the rare beaches that are entirely adorned by shells. The water in the L’Haridon Bight is highly saline. This is because of the local climate and geomorphology of the region. The salinity feature of the beach enabled the cockle to proliferate without restriction as the natural predators of it are unable to adjust to such environment. The shells of the beach form the sea floor that extends hundreds of yards from the shoreline. So many shells of the beach have been cemented together away from the water line over the upper parts of the beach.

Beaches Named on the List Besides Shell Beach

Besides WA’s Shell Beach, National Geographic named Lyme Regis in England and Floridian Sanibel Island’s Bowman’s Beach as the top three beaches on the list. Others on the list of 21 best beaches around the world included Blue Bay in Mauritius, Belize’s Pelican Beach, and Cas Abao Beach in Curacao. Moreover, Spain’s Cathedrals Beach has been listed as one of the “geographic wonders” of the world whereas Playa del Amor emerged as the “hidden beach” situated in the Marietas Islands in Mexico.

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