The Bureau of Meteorology has released a report on Thursday stating that 2016 was the fourth-warmest year to date.   Australia weather witnessed extreme temperatures throughout the year in 2016.

The weather forecaster’s Annual Climate Statement stated that the average national mean temperature increased to 0.87C. This has made 2016 one of the few years that has made Australia warm.

BoM Puts Forth Reasons for Such Extreme Australia Weather

Australia’s BoM claimed that fossil fuels burning and the strong El Nino also contributed to the heat level. They could be the reasons behind the extreme increase in the mercury level that made 2016, one of the warmest years in the country. The bureau also mentioned bushfires in some of the Aussie regions as well as the worst coral bleaching also contributed.

BoM’s senior climatologist Blair Trewin talked about the 2016 Australia weather and told News.com.au that the rise in the level of temperature was the result of the El Nino weather system and climate change. “Australia’s climate in 2016 was certainly consistent with long-term trends over the last century which has seen Australia warm to the same degree as the rest of the world and all the indications are these warming trends will continue into the future.”

The bureau also added that the extreme Australia weather did not have a positive effect on the terrestrial, aquatic or other ecosystems. In addition, the bureau also held the extreme Australia weather responsible for the damage of the dense kelp forests, salmon stocks, and oyster farms.

According to reports, Sydney and Darwin were the two cities that experienced the hottest maximum rise in temperature as well as hottest minimum temperature. The release of the report has come following the continuous heatwave blowing through south-eastern Australia.  The regulator also stated that Melbourne and Sydney are expected to remain in the mid-thirties in the coming days. While South Australia is expected to reach 39 degrees as we move towards the weekend. The heatwave seems to have no indications of coming to an end.

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