Zika Virus: Second Case Confirmed in China

Zika virus

The second Zika virus case is confirmed in China. The Second case was detected a day after the first victim was discharged from the hospital. Both the patients has travelled to Venezuela.

According to the Chinese Centre of Disease Control and Prevention, the second victim who was suffering from fever when he arrived at the Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport had contracted the virus during his trip to Venezuela. The victim’s sex and age was not disclosed, stated South China Morning Post. The blood and urine sample came back positive and the case is confirmed now.

The patient had worked in Venezuela for three years. He came into contact with a friend who had a mosquito-borne disease in January.  Twelve days later, the symptoms started showing on the Chinese victim.  Before reaching Guangzhou, the second victim transferred flights in Netherlands and Russia.

Previously, a 34-year-old man was confirmed as the first patient of Zika in China. The officials at that time claimed that there was very little chance of spreading the virus from the victim. They justified their argument by stating the climactic condition of the country.

The Hong Kong Health Department’s statement said that Hong Kong’s Port Health Office had started inspection at the airport in response and strengthened training for boundary control inspectors.

Zika is spreading rapidly across south and Central America. A report stated that 3100 pregnant women were already affected by the virus.

Government agencies in all over South America have advised women to avoid pregnancy to prevent the spread of the virus. However, the link between the virus and birth defects in the new born are not established scientifically till now. Thus, avoiding mosquito bites and using precaution could also help in this regard.

However, except China no other  Zika virus cases have been reported in Asia. Even so, World Health Organization had asked countries which have dengue cases to closely monitor for possible Zika infections.

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