US Government Wants to Remove QuickTime Application From Windows


QuickTime is not advisable to use. According to the latest news, the Department of Homeland Security has released a statement regarding the Quicktime application for the PC owners. The US Government had advised PC owners to uninstall Apple’s QuickTime for windows.

The government has explained the reason behind such advice. It says that two vulnerabilities have been found in its code, as Apple is not updating the version of the software.

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The DHS claims that the only way to mitigate it is to remove the software entirely, or users will have to bear the risk of “loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability of data, as well as damage to system resources or business assets,” notes Engadget.

Security firm named Trend Micro also reiterates the government’s advice to remove the QuickTime application from your computers. To recollect, Trend Micro was the company which started the Zero Day initiative and it noted the two QuickTime for Windows vulnerabilities. However, now the company says that so far it is not aware of any successful attacks that have used the security holes. It also noted that Apple will not roll out any patches to close them so it will remain inviting to malicious attacks from here on out.

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The US government has been regularly sending out security alerts about specific software through its Computer Emergency Readiness Team (CERT). However, the security alerts are often open-minded and advise people to use anti-virus software or keep updating regularly whenever it is rolled out.

Apple has terminated support for Windows a long time ago. The video player no longer supports either Windows 8 or Windows 10, even though some users hit upon a workaround.

Although DHS notes that Mac version of the software runs smoothly as it gets updates regularly. The company declined to comment to Reuters about the withdrawal of QuickTime support for windows.

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