Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Train Smashes Into Car, 2 Melbourne Women Killed

Train Smashes Into Car, 2 Melbourne Women Killed

Flickr/Stephen Parker

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Train services have resumed at Surrey Hills station following a car and train collision that occurred on Wednesday evening, killing two Melbourne women in their 70s.

The 71-year-old and 73-year-old were driving their 2010 black Hyundai when their car reached the center of the crossing on union Road where it collided with a train on the tracks. During the investigation, police officials found witnesses claiming the train was already halfway through the road level before the boom gates came down. They said that the car was dragged beneath the train through 100 meters of distance before it was pushed against the platform.

According to what the police claimed, the driver drove around the boom gates at the crossing. “They didn’t go around the boom gates at all,” acting sergeant Glen Whitehead said. “The motor vehicle has come across, was on the train line and then the boom gate has come down behind. “The driver was unsure of what to do from there and as a result, the train travelling through, an express train, then collided into the motor vehicle.”

The onlookers gathered on the spot to watch the recovery operation in the night while nearby residents blamed the Union Road level as the main cause of traffic disturbances that lead to accidents.

The accident has come following a recent report that revealed that Melbourne metro and rail services were unsafe because of the unfixed faults for a long time. The survey was conducted and the inference was recorded on the basis of the responses of the commuters.

Rail Tram and Bus Union Locomotive Division’s divisional secretary Marc Marotta said that the estimated speed of the express train that hit the car with two Melbourne women is 80 km/h while it approached the station. “The driver would not have had a clear view for a couple of hundred meters,” he said as quoted by the Herald Sun Thursday morning.

“There’s a sharp left-hand curve. The driver would not see it (the car) until about 200m. A 300-plus ton train doing 80km/h – you can’t stop. You have no hope.”

The secretary added that he had spoken to the driver and confirmed that he was an experienced and skilled professional.