A German actor who brought torture porn into the mainstream is now its most ardent hater.

A few years back, Rafael Santeria found a niche, which is already filled with a lot of disgusting subsets, described as torture porn as he was trying to make a name for himself in an already competitive industry in Germany.

While he was quickly introduced to the reality about his target market, early on as he realized that he’s really dealing with what he called as “dregs of society,” according to an interview with Vice mag.

But then ambition got the best of him as he ignored his instincts screaming at him to walk away and continue on his trajectory.

Even by its standards, torture porn—or hatef—k in Germany—really pushes the envelope by degrading, abusing and hurting the women. There are several rumors claiming porn actresses are really raped through some of these videos.

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What is clear, however, is that most of the women actresses were not told about the extent of the abuse they were going to be subjected to.

“People on the production team often said that they thought it would be good if the woman seemed to be bullied,” he said. “Sometimes the actresses themselves would say that: ‘I don’t always need to know everything, so the situation seems more heated for me.'”

Then he met his current fiancée, Jezzicat, who is also an actress in some torture porn videos. But when he started to speak out against the practice, the producers turned on him and allegedly, ramped up all the threats.

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Jezzicat also told the magazine that some of the producers tested Rafael by asking him to give her to one of them for sex, which he refused. The German porn actor then quickly deleted all the torture porn videos he uploaded on his YouTube account, left the house they were staying in to escape the persecution, and now is the most ardent protester of hatef—k.

“Turns out there’s a huge difference between verbal violence—which may not be entirely serious, like in a rap song—and physical violence, whether that plays out in front of a camera or not,” he said.