SpaceX’s Dragon Cargo Craft Makes Safe Landing to Earth, Brings Back Samples


SpaceX’s Dragon Cargo Craft  made a safe landing to Earth on Wednesday, bringing back the human research samples from the NASA science and technology.

The craft landed on water in the Pacific Ocean at 2:55 p.m; about 261 miles south-west of Long Beach, California. It was undocked from the International Space Station(ISS) after a month stay, according to NASA.

“Good splashdown of Dragon confirmed, carrying thousands of pounds of @NASA science and research cargo back from the @Space_Station,” SpaceX notified via Twitter.

It carried more than 1600 kilograms of science samples. They will be used in the study of the biochemical profile, fluid shifts, cardio box, microbiome, salivary markers and the Twins Study.

“The Dragon spacecraft has served us well, and it’s good to see it departing full of science, and we wish it a safe recovery back to planet Earth,” said Tim Peake, a European Space Agency astronaut.

According to Universe Today, the samples included a final batch of human research samples from former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly. They were a part of a historic one-year mission that ended in March. The plan was to back up NASA’s human “Mars’ Journey in the 2030s”.

“Thanks @SpaceX for getting our science safely back to Earth! Very important research,” tweeted Kelly.

According to ABC News, the following type of research is feasible in where Earth’s gravity does not interact with the sample molecules.

Moreover, the additional samples carried by the spacecraft will give the insight of journey to Mars. NASA is also working on to untangle “weightlessness of human body, isolation, radiation and the stress of long-duration spaceflight”.

The spacecraft, at the outset, carried lettuce seeds, lab mice, and an inflatable pop-up room.

Dragon spacecraft will be towed back to a port near Los Angeles. It will be returned to NASA within two days.

“Some cargo will be removed and returned to NASA, and then be prepared for shipment to SpaceX’s test facility in McGregor, Texas, for processing,” says NASA.

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