SpaceX Falcon 9 Launch: Get Ready for Friday Launch

Falcon 9

SpaceX will launch another Falcon 9 rocket today at 1:21 a.m. EDT (3:00 p.m.), carrying the Japanese communications satellite JCSAT-14. The Falcon 9 rocket will lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida which can be viewed on a live stream.

Apparently, the flight was delayed for 24 hours due to this week’s stormy weather in Cape Canaveral. The JCSAT-14 is expected to be deployed 32 minutes after takeoff.

According to SpaceX, the first stage of Falcon 9 will try to land on the “Of Course I Still Love You” drone ship. However, the American space transport services company admits that a successful landing would be unlikely since the rocket would be subjected to extreme velocities and re-entry heat.

JCSAT-14 is a telecommunications satellite by SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation, the foremost satellite operator in the Asia-Pacific region. The satellite will replace the JCSAT-2A and extend the former satellite’s geographical coverage to provide wider coverage of video distribution, communications and data transfer to Russia, Asia, Pacific Islands and Oceania, Middle East, and North America.

Deploying the JCSAT-14 is the fourth of SpaceX’s missions this year. Later this month, SpaceX expects to launch the Thaicom 8 communications station. Three flights are also coming up in June: one to lift off another Dragon cargo ship to the International Space Station, one in Vandenberg Air Force Base in California and another in Cape Canaveral.

SpaceX successfully landed a Falcon 9 rocket in the middle of the ocean on April 8, the first ocean landing done after four previous attempts. The rocket carried a Dragon cargo spacecraft that contained food supplies, station hardware and science experiments for the International Space Station crew members.

The first successful landing was in December 2015 when a Falcon 9 rocket landed on a ground-based landing pad in Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Its mission was to launch several communications satellites into low Earth orbit.

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