‘Shark Spotters’ Brought to Australia From South Africa

The increasing demand for a trial of the ‘shark spotters’ scheme in Australia has prompted South African representatives to take a trip to the nation and explain the program that has been applied successfully in Cape Town.

The Shark Spotters scheme is not only confined to identifying the sharks but it also warns and offers emergency assistance in case anyone gets surrounded or attacked by a shark. This surveillance and assistance program was adopted and has been proven successful in Cape Town after an increased number of shark attacks over there.

The Shark Spotters program that has recently been implemented was reportedly ignored by the government, according to activists. Sea Shepherd Australia has confirmed that the Shark Spotters program, which is an efficient shark monitoring system, has been a successful operation in South Africa for 11 years already. According to 9News, a review was prepared for the NSW Department of Primary Industries in 2015 that revealed the initiative was only for immediate trial in the Ballina area. However, the government ignored the initiative as confirmed by Natalie Banks, Sea Shepherd’s national shark campaign coordinator.

Activists Sea Shepherd and No Shark Cull have welcomed Project Manager Sarah Waries and co-founder and Field Manager Monwabisi Sikweyiya to the nation from South Africa via crowd funding. No Shark Cull Chairwoman Sharnie Connell said that the scheme is worth implementing efficient as it helps swimmers or beachgoers be aware about the presence of sharks. “It gives the public information around whether or not the spotting conditions are very good,” she said as quoted by the ABC.

“There’s certain flags that go up depending on whether or not the spotting conditions are good, or if they’re poor, people can make an informed choice whether they wish to take the risk. And then they have flags to alert people to whether or not there is a shark in the area or if there has been a shark seen relatively recently or if there’s been no shark sighted,” said Connell.

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