Recycling Brings 2.2K-lb Gold For Apple


In 2015, Apple started a program that allowed users to trade-in their broken iPhones. The move allowed the company to promote its campaign in recycling. Now, it seems that the Cupertino-based firm has found it profitable as new reports suggest that the tech giant recovered massive amounts of gold through the campaign.

According to a report from Engadget, the company managed to recover plenty of precious materials from used iPhones that have been traded in during its campaign. This also includes a whopping 2,204 pounds worth of gold.

Cult of Mac also reported the prices of the metal in this day and age, and found out that Apple has earned $51.79 million (US$40 million) with gold alone. Furthermore, the company also earned about 3 million pounds of copper and 4.5 million pounds of aluminum from the campaign, and they translated to about $8.29 million (US$6.4 million) and $4.14 million (US$3.2 million) respectively.

Below is the list of materials the company has re-acquired through the special campaign:

Steel – 23,101,000 pounds

Nickel – 39,672 pounds

Plastics – 13,422,360 pounds

Lead – 44,080 pounds

Glass – 11,945,680 pounds

Zinc – 130,036 pounds

Aluminum – 4,518,200 pounds

Tin – 4408 pounds

Copper – 2,953,360 pounds

Silver – 6612 pounds

Colbalt – 189,544 pounds

Gold – 2204 pounds

The company’s big push in turning itself to a green company over the last few years is now paying off. While the move does require huge efforts, the profits that can be reaped from it are surmountable.

“We’re as committed as ever to conserving precious resources. In 2015, we diverted more than 89 million pounds of e-waste from landfills. And more recently, we introduced Liam, a line of robots that can disassemble an iPhone every 11 seconds and sort its high-quality components so they can be recycled, reducing the need to mine those resources from the earth. It’s an experiment in recycling technology, and we hope this kind of thinking will inspire others,” wrote Apple in its Environmental Responsibility report.

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