Osaka 2016: Hakuho Sho Beats Harumafuji in One Second [Watch]

Hakuho Sho

Before MMA’s Conor McGregor, there was sumo’s Hakuho Sho. Less bloody, but just as exciting with its quick matches, it seems Hakuho Sho just made the world record for the fastest sumo wrestling win.

Hakuho Sho’s title defense against challenger Mongolian Harumafuji was settled in just 1 second. Yokuzuna Hakuho is the reigning champion for sumo for the past decade.

The yokuzuna dubbed as the White Peng started his 2016 Haru Basho with wins. Going into his final fight, he had made a clean record of 0 loss. His rival, Harumafuji is a champion in his own as well. Harumafuji has 7 Grand Tournament championships under his belt.

During the 36th Emperor’s Cup in Osaka annually held, Hakuho went to the ring with a waiting Kienosato waiting for his defeat. If Hakuho lost the match, he would have to face Kienosato right after his losing match for a tie breaker.

ALSO READ: Floyd Mayweather Back? Conor McGregor Releases ‘Fight Poster’

But the Hakuho-Kienosato bout didn’t happen. Harumafuji lunged at Hakuho to start the match. However, he was flung outside of the ring when Hakuho sidestepped. In the 1-second bout, Harumafuji lost due to Hakuho sidestepping.

Hakuho Sho sidesteps Harumafuji’s attack.

According to, Hakuho’s sidestepping move was “beyond the dignity of the top sumotori.”

ALSO READ: WWE News: Mass Firing And Huge Comebacks Teased!

However, Haru Basho 2016 has already concluded even with a lightning-fast bout that lasted 1 second. Hakuho Sho reigned over Harumafuji. He is still the reigning champion.

Dating back since the early 1800s, professional sumo wrestling has always been a revered traditional sport in Japan. It has since spread its global influence. Point in fact, the current sumo wrestling champion Hakuho Sho is a Mongolian.Born as Monkhbatyn Davaajargal, he grew up in a sumo-wrestling family fathered by a six-time Mongolian wrestling champion and Olympic silver medalist in freestyle wrestling.

Despite the controversial 1-second win, he is now seeking to extend his 37th title, Japan Times reports. He is currently tied with ozeki pair Goeido and Kisenosato at the Ryogoku Kokugikan which will last for 15 days.

To Top