Missing MH370 Parts found in Mozambique?


Investigators are examining debris found off Mozambique which could be from missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

Early photographic analysis showed that it could be the debris of the jetliner that disappeared 2 years ago, reported NBC News. It was found washed ashore in a sandbar in the Mozambique Channel. Blaine Gibson found the object. He, reportedly, chartered a boat and organized a trip over the weekend in the coast of Mozambique.

Gibson said, “It never occurred to me that I would find something like this here. It’s almost like a dream. I don’t know if it’s from 370 or another plane. Whatever it is, even if it’s not from 370, it raises awareness that people need to look for stuff on beaches.”

Gibson also said that his heart was pounding when he first saw the wreckage.

Investigators from Malaysia, Australia and United States have said that chances are good that the debris is from Boeing777. One of the photographs shows the words “No STEP” on it which could be from the planes horizontal stabilizer.

The wreckage is on its way to Malaysia for further investigation, reported CNN. The US officials confirmed that the part measures 35 inches by 22 inches. It is a piece of horizontal stabilizer skin. It is the part of the aircraft’s tail. The wreckage also includes a fastener. LISI Aerospace Fastener Company confirmed that the part found is an extremely standard one.

Jared Young, vice president of research and development, said, “I would expect to see this on many varieties of Boeing aircraft, not particular to a 777.”

An aviation source confirmed that no Boeing 777 was recorded as missing and MH370 was the only one.

According to Independent, there were several false alarms during the investigation previously.  A six foot long metal item found in the eastern state of Terengganu was among them. Australian Transport Safety Bureau said that it is aware of the discovery and will conduct a thorough examination of the object.

MH370 is considered one of the most baffling aviation mysteries of all time.

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