Melbourne Man’s Penis Signature Under Scanner


A Melbourne man has come under scanner after using a male genitalia’s caricature as his signature.

Jared Hyams started it as a joke. But it took a serious turn and he is now battling state federal government agencies over the question of the definition of right signature.

Presuming that Australian Electoral Commission authorities would fail to scrutinize the application, he scribbled a caricature of a penis instead of his signature, reported smh. His application was for change of his address.

“I thought that it would be a laugh; they would approve it and next day I would sign something different,” he said.

“But when I did this signature all of a sudden the shit hit the fan. I was receiving letters and phone calls telling me I couldn’t have it. I thought that’s interesting, why not?”, he told to smh.

Hyams was all set to use the male genitalia caricature signature in all official documents and tried to do so by applying for his passport, proof of age card and driver’s license. However, he soon came to know that bureaucrats did not take it in a jocular vein.

This prompted into a battle between him and state and federal government agencies.

AEC Annual Reports (2010-11) stated that according to Electoral and Referendum Act 2010, a transfer of enrollment could be done by AEC without a signature and only needed the date of birth and driving license number of the applicant. The statement also read that as the application form submitted by Hyams had both, the signature was not required. The Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) decided on 5th October 2010 to dismiss Hyams application referring to s.42B of the AAT. The AAT also called the application as “frivolous and vexatious”.

Jared Hyams has spent 5 years of his life fighting for the right to use his penis-signature. He has argued with The Department of Trade and Foreign Affairs, The Department of Justice, and Australian Electoral Commission. However,  none of the authorities is willing to share his humour and allow him to use the controversial signature.

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