Special Topics

Marco Rubio’s Campaign Confuses Vancouver for US City


The new campaign advertisement video of US Republican presidential hopeful Marco Rubio that promised a return to “morning in America” mistakenly featured the skyline of Canada’s Vancouver City. The first moments of the ad showed a tugboat bearing Canada’s flag drifting through Vancouver’s harbour.

The advertisement, where the narrative style resembles former US president Ronald Regan’s legendary ad “Morning Again in America,” focused on America’s decline under President Barack Obama’s tenure.

“It’s morning again in America,” the ad begun by saying. “Today, more men and women are out of work than ever before in our nation’s history.”

However, the error in the video was pointed out by several Canadians, who claimed that the opening scene in it is not at all American.

“It’s unmistakably Vancouver,” the Vancouver Sun reported on Monday. It indicated the presence of notable landmarks like the Harbour Centre tower and cranes of Port Metro Vancouver, in the video.

The CBC reported that the first shot used in the advertisement was taken by Vancouver-based videographer Guy Chavasse, who said he filmed it last August from a viewing tower in northern Vancouver.

“It’s pretty funny, isn’t it?” he said. “It’s a good-looking video, no doubt, but it’s pretty recognisable as Vancouver.”

He added, “I’m not exactly a big Republican fan or a Rubio supporter,” but noted that “it’s always cool to see your stuff being used”.

A spokesman for Rubio told the Buzzfeed that featuring the Vancouver skyline in the video was completely unintentional.

“Ha! Nice catch by Buzzfeed – we hadn’t noticed that,” he said. “We are not going to make Canada an issue in this election.”

However, this is not the first time that a candidate’s advertisement faced trouble with American imagery. In September last year, a group supporting former Florida governor Jeb Bush launched a campaign ad on his behalf that featured images from parts of the UK and south-east Asia for American locations, the BBC reported.


To Top