Johnny Depp Mocked in ‘Hostage Video:’ Barnaby Joyce Proud of Biosecurity Rules


Even though the dog controversy around actor Johnny Depp seemed to have an amicable end on Monday at the court, yet the reverberations are a bit slow dying down.

This is despite Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce trying to extricate from the controversy he flagged over Depp’s dog apology video as “embarrassing.”  He has now shifted the focus to biosecurity rules in Australia and its victory.

The 9 News quotes the comment of comedian Ricky Gervais who called it “a hostage video.” The celebrity couple escaped conviction over the dog-smuggling saga on Monday afternoon at an Australian court.

The actor’s wife Amber Heard pleaded guilty of knowingly producing a misleading document. Later  an apology video was released by the Australian government, where a stony-faced Heard and Depp are seen expressing they are “truly sorry that Pistol and Boo were not declared. Protecting Australia is important.”

In the video, Depp’s wife says she is “truly sorry” for not declaring the dogs Pistol and Boo and salutes Australia’s strict biosecurity laws.

Heard regrets not properly declaring Pistol and Boo at the airport.

“Protecting Australia is important  to declare everything when you enter Australia. Thanks,” Depp signs off.

In an early comment, the Deputy Prime Minister said Depp and actress wife Amber Heard were looking like reluctant ‘stars’ in the filmed apology.

“I don’t think it is something that they would have willingly wanted to do,” Joyce said.

“When (people come) into this nation they will say: This is one thing Australians are red hot about, biosecurity, don’t take it as a joke, this is one thing they are noted for.”

Meanwhile, a CNN report notes how a somber apology settled a non-declaration of two Yorkshire terriers. It notes how the current Deputy PM, who was then an Agriculture Minister had threatened to incarcerate the dogs and stirred an international controversy.

It quotes Joyce that he was pleased that the video was getting rave views all around the world.

“At the end of it, we’ve got a message that is going all around the world right now. It’s going off like a frog in a sock telling people that if you come into this nation and you don’t obey our laws, you’re in trouble. That’s what this is about.”

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