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International Women’s Day 2016: ‘Never Take a Step Back’ Says Female Ministers Women/Ryan Brown

Six female Australian Cabinet Ministers congregate to celebrate International Women’s Day 2016. When the Liberal Government came into play in 2013 there was one female Cabinet Minister. Three years later, six females have been selected.

Minister for Women and Employment Michaelia Cash along with Nationals Leader Fiona Nash, Defence Minister Marise Payne, Health Minister Sussan Ley and Small Business Minister Kelly O’Dwyer celebrate and offer advice to young women.

According to Sydney Morning Herald, Senator Cash is expected to address the National Press Club to elaborate on International Women’s Day.

Cash will call for the cooperation between government and employers to address issues that still hinder equality within the workforce. She stated that the coalition will raise the target for women holding federal board positions from 40-50 percent. Individual board positions will be raised to a target minimum of 40 percent.

The senator will also focus on women’s economic empowerment. Cash calls for all existing barriers to be removed, stating that only 34 percent of graduates in science, mathematics, engineering and technology are female.

Cash also aims at making flexible working hours the norm by encouraging women to participate in what is socially known as “male jobs” and by encouraging flexible working hours. In doing so, progress will be made. These changes allow women and men to combine the roles of “breadwinner” and “caretaker”.

The Sydney Morning Herald looked at closing the gap between male and female entrepreneurs. Believing more female startups would break through these barriers as well as increase Australia’s economy. The site explained why there is such a gap between male and female entrepreneurs. The two main issues are confidence and technology. Women are not as confident as males and are lacking in technological  education.

International Women’s Day also called for feminism to be reviewed. The Independent, focused on women who were not celebrating International Women’s Day.

One case is Ellen Grace Jones, aged 33. Jones explains that modern day feminism is out of touch with its traditional aims and agenda. She also believes that International Women’s day focuses on more advantages for women in the work force. Jones believes this crucial. However, she makes the point that the day only celebrates the needs of western women. Jones makes mention of women in the Middle East and North Korea whose basic female rights have yet to be addressed.

Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop, however, celebrates what has already been achieved.

“I recall very well a meeting in Kabul with a group of female parliamentarians. They were complaining that they only had four women in cabinet,” she shared. “I remember at the time we had less than that. But I now sit in a cabinet with six women and other women in the ministry. So I know what a difference it can make.”

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