First US Uterus Transplant Fails, Organ Removed from Patient because of Complication

uterus transplant

The first uterus transplant carried out in the United States has failed. However, the patient a 26-year-old woman is recovering. She is identified only as Lindsey.

The Cleveland Clinic conducted the transplant, reported NBC News. The statement issued by the clinic read, “We are saddened to share that our patient, Lindsey, recently experienced a sudden complication that led to the removal of her transplanted uterus.”

Reporting about the condition of the patient the statement further said, “While this has been difficult for both the patient and the medical team, Lindsey is doing well and recovering”.

Lindsey and her husband are not disappointed by the failure. On the contrary, they said that they are grateful to the doctors. Lindsey said that the doctors acted very promptly for her health and safety.

She also stated that it was unfortunate that she lose the uterus to complications. She, at the same time, expressed her appreciation for the prayers and good thoughts by the people.

Lindsey, before the operation, told the press that when she was 16 she was told that she could not have a biological child.  She also informed that they have three adopted boys. Even so, she opted for the operation as she wanted to see whether she could conceive.

The clinic stated that the circumstances of the complication were under review and further information would be shared afterwards.

There are other countries which tried uterus transplant and also reported some failures. The first successful birth was reported by Sweden in 2014 , stated The Guardian.  The procedure has been done nine times in the country and out of which five were successful.

In future this experimental technique might help women born without a uterus or those who lost it under some medical condition, a chance at pregnancy. This will be an alternative to adoption or surrogacy.

The Cleveland Clinic has planned 10 such transplant and this was the first among them. According to the United Network for Organ Sharing, Texas’s Baylor University and Boston’s Brigham and Women’s hospital are two other hospitals which got approval for uterus transplant studies.

However, Cleveland hospital decided to use uterus from deceased donors instead of exposing living donors to the risk of surgery. Apparently, in Sweden uterus from living donors are used for the study.

Medical science has become so advance that even birth defects can be treated now. The study is a hope for those women who are born without a uterus or lost it due to some disease.

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