Federal Election 2016: Polls Show Labor Leading as Turnbull, Shorten Kick Off Campaigns


On Monday, the latest Newspoll conducted by The Australian has indicated a tight battle between the Coalition and Labor party, showing the latter’s lead in the federal election of 2016 .

The Australian federal election is just around the corner, scheduled on July 2. With the new poll, Labor stood 51 percent ahead of the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull-led coalition with 49 percent. After the first budget was presented by Treasurer Scott Morrison, almost 1,739 people were surveyed from Thursday to Saturday for The Australian polls. The latest Fairfax-Ipsos poll also showed the 50-50 voting opinions.

The reports, apart from the pure results, also indicated that most people still prefer Turnbull as the prime minister over Opposition Leader Bill Shorten. Almost 53 percent of the voters expected Turnbull’s government to remain in power. The poll shows the primary voting for Turnbull to have increased to 44 percent, which is 10 points ahead of Labor. As far as being preferred as the prime minister, Turnbull is Australia’s first choice with 49 percent votes, while Shorten managed to grab only 27 percent.

Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce has recently been opening up about the federal election 2016. He warned the elections to “absolutely knock the stuffing out of all of us.”

“It is going to infuriate, bore, send people crazy, ultimately – the cameramen are nodding – what’s going to happen is that the Australian people get to make that incredible choice that so many people in so many other nations never get the opportunity to do. What a wonderful thing a democracy is.”

According to what 9News reported, the latest Ipsos poll suggested that only 37 percent of the people surveyed felt the budget was fair. Finance Minister Mathias Cormann said he already expected the race to remain tight with a few weeks left for the elections. “The election was always going to be close. It means that every vote matters and it means that people will have to weigh up very carefully the choice they make,” he told ABC radio on Monday.

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