Some of the voters, who backed Barack Obama in 2008, are now supporting a candidate who is completely different from the first African-American president of the United States. Donald Trump has found unlikely supporters for his presidential campaign.

When Trump declared his presidential run in June 2015, he said the “American Dream” had died. The campaign started on a strikingly different note compared to what Obama promoted: hope and change.

While Obama talked about uniting the country by merging racial division, Trump is appreciated for his plans to ban Muslims from entering the US and to build a wall on the Mexican border. Trump is more animated than Obama who carries a composed demeanour.

Some of Trump’s backers say they supported Obama’s campaign in 2008 when the Democrat leader made a promise of change. They still demand change but their vision is more realistic, they say.

CNN refers to Barnstead machinist Gary Chagnon, who voted for Obama both in 2008 and in 2012. He said Trump’s promise to “Make America Great Again” drew him closer to the Republican candidate. The 50-year-old believes America needs a president “with a set of balls,” which he thinks Trumps has.

His wife Annette believes the same. Despite voting for Obama both in 2008 and in 2012, she blames him for being too lenient on the borders. “I don’t think he’s paid enough attention to that and it contributes to us having home-grown people coming in and killing us,” she said. “I don’t like it and I like that Trump is right on that.”

“I don’t think he’s paid enough attention to that and it contributes to us having home-grown people coming in and killing us,” she said. “I don’t like it and I like that Trump is right on that.”

According to a CNN/WMUR poll released on Sunday, Trump is leading the race in New Hampshire. He is leading with 31 percent while his closest rival, Marco Rubio, has managed 15 percent. Ted Cruz, who won the Iowa caucuses, is at the third spot with 13 percent. John Kasich and Jeb Bush are close to Cruz with 11 percent and 10 percent, respectively.