Wednesday, September 28, 2016

China Obsessed Over Lucas Papaw Ointment: 5 Reasons Why AU-Made Red Tube Is A Hit

China Obsessed Over Lucas Papaw Ointment: 5 Reasons Why AU-Made Red Tube Is A Hit

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Lucas’ Papaw Ointment is one of Australia’s most popular home-made products widely used by a lot of beauty enthusiasts around the country.

The popular Aussie ointment, which was created in a backyard shed in Queensland and made with 100 percent Australian papaw, has expanded its reach in other parts of the world, gaining a cult following in several places like Hong Kong and China.

What makes this little red tube so popular in the most populated country around the globe? CT Johnson, an expert in the Chinese marketplace and also Cross Border Management’s managing director, cites a couple of reasons, according to News.com.au.

For one, the backstory of Lucas’ Papaw Ointment has proven to be a hit among Chinese consumers. “It’s more than a hundred years old and they love that. They love something that’s had the authenticity of being around a long time.”

Johnson also explained that Chinese beauty enthusiasts make such a huge deal about authenticity, revealing that they have had to deal with fake products for the last 30 or 40 years. “They’ve had a lot of counterfeiting that has gone on in that market.”

Another reason Johnson pointed out as to why the product is so popular in China is because of its “distinctive” red packaging.

“That does not hurt because red is the color of success and money in China, so a red tube with an Australian-made product with a long history—that is a fantastic combination.”

Lucas’ Papaw Ointment is made of the finest-grown fresh fruit in the state of Queensland and can be used to treat certain skin ailments such as burns, rashes, cuts and splinters. It can also be used as lip gloss.

The ointment is extremely renowned in China, with Chinese customers even causing a shortage of the product, such that pharmacists have limited purchases to just two tubes per person.

The family business also had to limit the amount they provided to wholesalers who deliver it to China, making sure that more products remained in the country, according to the Daily Mail.