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‘Call of Duty’ Sued for Depicting Angolan Rebel


The family of Angolan warlord Jonas Savimbi has sued the popular game “Call of Duty – Black Ops II” for depicting his personality. Savimbi’s children alleged the Activision Blizzard for showing him as a “barbarian brute” in the action game.

They have filed defamation lawsuit in the French branch of Activision to court in Nanterre, near the French capital. They sued the game developers for €1m (£750,000) as a damage amount for badly portraying their father in the game.

They claimed that Savimbi is shown as “a big halfwit who wants to kill everybody”, according to a report by Mirror.

“Seeing him kill people, cutting someone’s arm off… that isn’t Dad,” said Cheya Savimbi.

In the game, it shows Savimbi conversing with his brother warlords and preparing them for battle against enemies. In the next scene he climbs up the truck brandishing a grenade gun along with his force. After sighting his enemies, he directs his force saying “ Here they come. Here they come my brothers. Fight my Brothers! ”.

The African rebel waged a decade long civil war against the Angolan government by forming a rebel-led government Unita in 1966 in eastern Angola. The government was assisted by US and the apartheid government in South Africa while the Soviet Union and Cuba helped Savimbi’s political party for a strong political backdrop, according to a report filed by BBC.

In 2002, he died fighting in a clash with the state forces. He was called the most fearless freedom fighter by former President Ronald Reagan.

“This case concerns everyone: a video game can take your name, your face and cast into question your notoriety,” the family’s lawyer, Carole Enfert, told The Telegraph, in a report by  Mirror. 

Disagreeing with the statements by Savimbi’s chidlren, Activision Blizzard’s lawyer, Etienne Kowalski, said that the game shows Savimbi as a strong warrior and a hero. “It shows his original character in Angolan history, a guerrilla chief who fought the MPLA.”

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