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Brazil: PMBD Quits, Calls for Dilma Rousseff’s Exit


Brazilian Democratic Movement Party(or PMBD) on Tuesday quit from its six-year long alliance with Dilma Rousseff’s Workers’ Party and called for her exit. PMBD terminated its coalition after leaders of the party voted concertedly.

“Brazil can’t go on with this economy, there are millions losing their jobs,” said Wellington Moreira Franco, head of PMDB think tank.

“This is going to be a three-year recession. Government spending keeps growing. We have to fix this.”

PMBD’s exit could seriously hamper Rousseff’s expectations to avoid the impeachment as she could fail to get congressional support. Moreover, most of PMBD’s federal deputies and senators could vote for her dismissal.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the secession by PMBD could drive the small parties to withdraw from Rousseff’s administration. On Wednesday, Progressive Party, a coalition ally said that it would need to look again whether to continue with the coalition.

Senior officials from Workers’ Party consider the move “a coup against the president”. They said Rousseff can derail the impeachment if she gets support from the members of PMBD individually.

According to The Guardian, three members could still refuse to quit the cabinet by April 12. However, PMBD’s defection has dampened the hope of any strong support for the president.

“This is her D-Day. [Now the PMDB has left] the possibility of her impeachment increases to 90%,” said David Fleischer, political science professor at the University of Brasília.

For the past weeks, Rousseff is in the middle of political warfare with opposition trying to haul her down over her involvement in an alleged financial misconduct.

Earlier this month, more than one million people clamoured and went on anti-government protests against Dilma Rousseff over Brazil’s biggest corruption scandal.

Out of five hundred thirteen, 342 deputies in the lower house gave their thumbs up; the impeachment would easily move ahead to the senate. And Rousseff would be suspended for 180 days. Brazil’s vice-president, Michel Temer, also the leader of PMBD would then take her place temporarily. However, the final decision would be done by October.

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