Australia’s First ‘Ambulance Bus’ – Ambus Unveiled

Ambus is here!

The first ambulance bus in Australia has been unveiled in Adelaide on Jan. 24. At 12 metres long, this Ambus has the capacity to treat 12 patients at once while responding to major emergencies.

The South Australian government believes this will enable paramedics to work more effectively, responding to multiple accidents or disasters without wasting valuable time. Health Minister Jack Snelling added that this vehicle gives paramedics the critical advantage when helping those in need in common accidents like bushfires and car crashes.

Snelling unveiled the bus, describing it as a revolutionary vehicle that will be used to transport patients from the current Royal Adelaide Hospital to the new Royal Adelaide Hospital, which is scheduled to open later in 2016. The Ambus is geared with innovative technology and can carry six patients on stretchers and the other six sitting while there is still enough room for two healthcare workers in the patient treatment area and another where a paramedic will drive.

Andy Long, the South Australia Ambulance Service director of metropolitan service delivery, said that the Ambus will also be used for jobs outside emergency situations once all testing of the vehicle is completed. For example, people can expect to see the bus at work in large scale events such as the Schoolies Festival in 2017.

The Ambus has been used in Japan and the US, which requires the deployment of up to six medical personnel: an EMT driver, a paramedic crew chief, two paramedics and two emergency medical technicians. The ratio of one patient to four caregivers is also required.

Additionally, the Advanced Life Support systems and critical care transport are equipped into each vehicle that will accommodate the needs of patients.  Apparently, some buses are well-adapted for chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defence incidents and can also be used to quarantine or isolate contaminated patients.

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