Monday, September 26, 2016

Australia Federal Election 2016: Coalition to Lose Election?

Australia Federal Election 2016: Coalition to Lose Election?

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The latest Newspoll results have reflected the deteriorating status of the Coalition in the Australia federal election 2016 on Monday following the leaders’ debate in Canberra on Sunday.

It has faced an almost six percent decline in Queensland while it’s 7.3 percent in Western Australia, with 3.6 percent in New South Wales. The Guardian Australia stated the analysis of Oz, which said that the loss of support for the Coalition is enough for it to lose the election. “The Turnbull government is facing the prospect of losing 10 seats in NSW, six in Queensland and three in Western Australia, with a significant slump in support in the key election battlegrounds,” Oz report stated.

“The polling also reveals that the Coalition, Labor, and the Greens have surrendered significant ground in South Australia, where Nick Xenophon’s party has attracted one in five primary votes.”

The sudden rise in the number of votes for independent Senator Xenophon surprised Australians. Newspoll showed that the rate of satisfaction with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has declined to 18 points in his home state of NSW. The deterioration in the rate was evident since Christmas. The decline is even lower than ex-prime minister Tony Abbott’s 37 percent prior to his leadership fall.

The disinterest in the support for Turnbull might have been the result of the responses of the prime minister to issues raised by Allan Jones, the host of a breakfast radio program that aired the PM’s interview in both Queensland as well as NSW. Such a vast slump in the level of support for the Turnbull government just five weeks ahead of the Aussie elections on July 2, 2016 might endanger the Coalition’s position.

Newspoll surveyed 6,819 voters. According to The Australian, overall, the poll has stipulated that the Australia federal election 2016 features a better position of the Coalition than it was during the time of Abbott’s replacement in September, but there is a significant decrease in the level of support for it in Victoria, WA, and NSW that might twist and turn the election scenario.