Friday, September 30, 2016

How Aurukun Teens Ruin Lives of Queensland School Kids

How Aurukun Teens Ruin Lives of Queensland School Kids

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Aurukun teens have made it very difficult for teachers and high-achieving students to conduct classes conveniently, the Indigenous community’s group of mothers complained.

The teens from the Indigenous community are now controlling the Queensland Government schools like “puppeteers,” thereby making students interested in studying be forced to leave schools for weeks. The Western Cape York primary school was evacuated on Wednesday. This is the second time in a month when teachers and staff members had to suffer from such a disruptive situation. The ABC reported that the teachers and staff will not return to schools for six weeks.

Police Commissioner Ian Stewart said that there were children, who were as young as six, present on the street when the Aurukun kids threw rocks at staffs’ houses. They also targeted the guards assigned on security duty outside the staffs’ homes.The teens have threatened teachers as well as Principal Scott Fatnowna. According to 9News, the principal had his government car stolen twice within a fortnight prior to the incident.

Reports have indicated that the school will remain closed until the new term starts after six weeks. Students will be offered distance learning through PCYC. The Aurukun PCYC is an entity that encourages learning, sports, recreation, participation in the community. “We are mothers in shock that our children, high-achieving children, will be deprived of schooling for weeks,” the ABC quoted the mothers in the group as saying.

“While teachers and staff absolutely have a right to feel safe and secure, and parents have a responsibility to ensure their children behave respectfully, our children also have a right to a good education. Nowhere else in Australia would a Government condone shutting down a school due to the incompetence of police to pull into line a handful of troublemakers.”

Federal Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion expressed his hopes on meeting Curtis Pitt, his state counterpart, and discussed the Aurukun matter in details. “I think the passive racism that has allowed that to happen over years and years in this country,” he said.