Apple Lost Privacy Fight With FBI; Left 1000 Devices In ‘Limbo’?

The logo for Apple Computer, now en:Apple Inc.. The design of the logo started in 1977 designed by en:Rob Janoff with the rainbow color theme used until 1999 when Apple stopped using the rainbow color theme and used a few different color themes for the same design.

Apple is facing a serious problem after the FBI announced that it was able to hack an iPhone, leaving the consumers with questions regarding the security of their personal information, now that the bureau has just discovered a way to break into an Apple device.

The Apple software engineers remain puzzled as to how the FBI got into the phone’s digital locks without the company’s help. This move has also led to a more complicated task for Apple to fix the flaws that have jeopardized the company’s software, USA Today reported.

Regarding Apple’s legal battle with the Bureau, The Justice Department has already announced that it was withdrawing a legal case against Apple that compels the company to assist in unlocking the phone. This sudden decision by the government to drop a legal battle over a suspect’s iPhone has added uncertainty to other criminal cases where the local and state officials have been faced with over 1,000 locked smartphones and other devices. It further blocks the access to possible evidence, based on a survey of over 12 jurisdictions.

Although it is a top secret how the FBI was able to hack an iPhone, some clues have begun to emerge. According to a senior law enforcement official, the Bureau overcame Apple’s security feature that can erase the phone’s data if the FBI failed to enter the right combination of the passcode for 10 tries. This has let the government make a guess about the right passcode by using random combinations until the phone’s software accepted the right passcode.  

But even without disclosing the details, the FBI’s announcement is in disagreement with the firm recommendation of the US government that security researchers should constantly work co-operatively and secretly with software manufacturers prior to disclosing that a device might be vulnerable to hackers. These guidelines present a process on when and how to reveal that a commercial software might be susceptible, and ensures the online security of the American consumers, The Star reported.

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