German Chancellor Angela Merkel said she would stand by her decision on the refugee crisis despite admitting that the approach has inflicted short term damages to Germany. Merkel made the comment the day after her ruling party experienced disastrous election results, which is being considered as an impact of her refugee policies.

After suffering considerable losses to the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party, Merkel confessed that it would be better for the country if the western Balkan nations do not allow the asylum seekers to move further into the European Union.

However, she made a renewed appeal she urged the voters to consider the larger picture of the refugee crisis and said that only a common European agreement was capable of bringing about a perfect solution.

“It is unquestionable that Germany benefits [from the migrant route closure], but we can see from pictures out of Greece that that is not a sustainable solution,” the Independent quoted her as telling reporters. “I am firmly convinced, and that wasn’t questioned today, that we need a European solution and that this solution needs time.”

An editorial piece in the Telegraph read, “According to the cover of The Economist a few months ago, she is “The Indispensable European”. It added, “And yet, with catastrophic regional election results over the weekend, the writing is now on the wall for her Chancellorship. Lots will be written about what a terrible loss that will be. But

It added, “And yet, with catastrophic regional election results over the weekend, the writing is now on the wall for her Chancellorship. Lots will be written about what a terrible loss that will be. But in fact she has been a disaster for the European economy. She has allowed the euro crisis to drift dangerously on. She had presided over an alarming decline in Germany’s competitiveness. And she has permitted Britain to drift toward an exit from the EU, while encouraging mass immigration that the German economy simply can’t cope with.”

It further read that, if Merkel finally steps down, it will give another leader a chance to mend the problems that has torn the region apart.

The AfD has won seats across half of 16 state legislatures in Germany, and also in the European parliament. It has managed to attract votes from the established parties and also those who have not previously voted.