Thursday, September 29, 2016

Adelaide City Council to Reject Govt’s Building Redevelopment Norms?

Adelaide City Council to Reject Govt’s Building Redevelopment Norms?

Flickr/Lance Perryman

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The Adelaide City Council has opposed the state government’s proposal to redevelop some of the iconic buildings of North Adelaide.

The Adelaide government has proposed to extend the existing boundaries of some of the historic institutions and colleges across North Adelaide. The council discussed the iconic landmarks to be redeveloped as decided by the government on Monday. The names comprised 11 large structures to be redeveloped, including the Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Calvary Hospital, Helping Hand Aged Care, etc.

The council put forth the restrictions to be imposed while redeveloping the large sites as jotted down by the government. However, the state government wanted the council to withdraw the restrictions with respect to the height, area and usage of the iconic buildings because the limitations would not allow the developers to construct the structures properly based on future requirements.

The developers will only be “innovative” and “responsive” to the requirements if they are allowed to work without any restrictions, according to the North Adelaide government. Lord Mayor Martin Haese, on the other hand, said that the restrictions were important to be imposed on the construction proposal to make sure the character of the state improves overall.

“Residences abutting those properties currently enjoy views across Adelaide, and in many ways, that’s why people live in these houses,” the ABC quoted him as saying. “We would like to limit the heights on some of the sites and not to go beyond the delineated boundaries of those 11 sites.”

Haese said that if the restrictions would not be imposed, it will be taken as a bad precedent. The opposing side’s member said that they were uncomfortable in extending the geographical boundaries in any manner.

The Adelaide City Council is ready to draft a letter to the state government insisting upon balancing the abilities of both the health and education sectors so that they could expand the services to a proper limit to the population across the state.