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10 Amazing ‘Snow Moon’ Photos That You Need to See!

Snow Moon

The moon is one magnificent sight! Its various avatars—the “blue moon,” the “blood moon,” and so on are just mesmerising. Now, add the “snow moon” to the list too. For the uninitiated, the lunar cycle is around 29 days. As a result, the month of February has no full moon. However, once every 19 years, the month of February gets its full moon. This is called the “snow moon.”

According to AOL, the name snow moon represents the second month of the year that typically witnesses a high snow fall. The “snow moon” was visible in North America on Monday night at 1:20 p.m. EST, explains Weather.com. People stopped in their tracks to catch the moment on their cameras and the social media is buzzing with the “snow moon” photos.

Here are some of the magnificent “snow moon” photos you missed.

Snow moon #minimalism #canon #portland #pdx #naturephotography #landscapephotography #portlandia #portlandnw #oregonnw #canon_photos

A photo posted by susan mecouch (@greyskynw) on

I should be glad of another encounter! #5AM #moon #moonshots #fullmoon #snowmoon #k5winter #igers_seattle

A photo posted by Al Garman (@al_garman) on

According to the Almanac, Native Americans gave a nickname to almost all the full moons in a bid to help different tribes track the seasons. The Almanac further explains that the early Native Americans had no means to record time. They did not use the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Instead, they kept a track of time by observing the seasons and lunar months with some differences, depending on each tribe.

Another famous moon includes the “harvest moon,” which is the full moon that comes closest to the autumnal equinox. Then there are the “hunger moon” and “bone moon,” other names of the usual full moon given by tribes, informs AOL. These were given during harsh weather conditions leading to a shortage of food. The tribes then relied on the bone marrow soup.

However, there is a difference between the “blood moon” and the “snow moon” in the sense that the “snow moon” is not a scientific phenomena. The “snow moon” will not look unusual, explains Independent.

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